Remembrance Day…at the11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month the guns fell silent 95 years this Remembrance Day.

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This solemn day can be a day of remembrance and reflection for all young minds and their educators. While this article explores tasks that may suit primary aged students, the tasks can be adapted to suit any learning situation.

By focusing on the whole centre or whole class with a group planting of a tree of remembrance you could initiate a long term reflection area. Also, involve the local RSL to make this a community project.

For older readers, a research task focused on local community members is an ideal learning experience. A part of this could include the composing of a timeline of locals who served in WWI and the subsequent wars. This could lead to the design and construction of an honour board so the school has a permanent display.

Get the young out and about in their world by visiting the local war memorial. A guest speaker from the local RSL or Vietnam Veterans Association is a brilliant way to make the learning come alive.

Create an oral history project by visiting nursing homes. While no Australian who served in WWI is alive, their brothers, sisters, nephews and nieces, children and grandchildren might still be here and willing to have their stories recorded. This will allow students to develop their non-fiction writing style.Create a portfolio of written work: guide students in the creation of letters and diary entries written from the perspectives of soldiers at the time of WWI. Students will demonstrate their empathy when they write to the children of the French towns Australians tried to protect in WWI. Creative writing activities will enable your students to look at war from a range of perspectives.  Creative poems and short stories about the experiences of war can be a good way for students to express their creativity and empathy for the soldiers and the families they left behind. Also, introduce feature article and newspaper report writing and have students research and write reports about locals who died during the war.

Create an oral history project by visiting nursing homes. While no Australian who served in WWI is alive, their brothers, sisters, nephews and nieces, children and grandchildren might still be here and willing to have their stories recorded. This will allow students to develop their non-fiction writing style.

World War One Soldier tending to a grave of a fallen comrade. Original reads: 'OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT. BATTLE OF BROODSEYNDE [Broodseinde]. Near Ypres. A Tommy inspecting the grave of one of our fallen heroes.'

Used Under 'Creative Commons, Attribution — Noncommercial — Share-alike 2.5 UK: Scotland'.